Assaying, Microscopy, Mineralogy & XRF/XRD

Assaying, Microscopy, Mineralogy & XRF/XRD

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Jewelry sample testing - Assaying (4 replies and 3 comments)

S
bezelsunl
4 weeks ago
bezelsunl 4 weeks ago

I work for a jewelry company and want to get a full analysis of the metals we use. Them being stainless steel alloy, 10k, 14, and 18k. Gold. I was recommended to use a fire assay but after asking around I notice companies require at least 30g of samples. 

Would a fire assay be the best method to get the information I need? If not, is there another method?

 

David
4 weeks ago
David 4 weeks ago

you don't need 30g for a fire assay

NolanGoddard@actlabs.com

SmartDog
4 weeks ago
SmartDog 4 weeks ago
1 like by David

It should be noted that a fire assay is a distructive test, you do not get back your original material.  What you get back is a gold slug for each grade that is close to 99% gold.  If you want to maintain your original material then you need to look at x-ray flouesecence (XRF) which is close to a non-destructible examination (NDE).  XRF can be used on almost any metallic material to determine the assay.  

Also how often will you be doing this?  If only once then an outside lab is fine.  Otherwise you might want to look at getting a handheld unit for your shop (can be expensive, but then so is regular testing).

S
bezelsunl
4 weeks ago

We have a handheld x-ray device but we need a more accurate process that tells us exactly what metals are there. We want to replicate and manufacture these pieces using raw materials.

S
bezelsunl
4 weeks ago

We don't mind losing the original material. This would be a one time job to find out the chemical makeup so that we can manufacture them.

David
4 weeks ago
David 4 weeks ago

A typical fire assay is 30 g for feed grades.

If it is a concentrate or high grade we can do as little as 5 g

As Mike says, the best for no losses is an XRF.

S
bezelsunl
4 weeks ago

We don't mind the loss of material as long as we get a full chemical make-up.

SmartDog
4 weeks ago
SmartDog 4 weeks ago

Fire assays are not 100% accurate, especially for determining  specific concentrations.  For that a gas chromatograpy would give greater precision.

 

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