Froth Flotation (Sulphide & Oxide)

Froth Flotation (Sulphide & Oxide) 2017-03-23T09:43:25+00:00
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Limonite in Cu sulphide Ore (6 replies)

Sachin Prakash
1 year ago
Sachin Prakash 1 year ago

Is anyone aware of a paper or publication or literature addressing the issue with copper sulphide flotation at the presence of Limonite in the ore complex?

Bill Rico
1 year ago
Bill Rico 1 year ago

Am not aware of any papers BUT I hear Sherritt has high Limonite in the Moab Bay East Zone (Northern Miner article)

Sachin Prakash
1 year ago
Sachin Prakash 1 year ago

I'm looking for that article in internet. Has anyone dealt with sulphide copper flotation in presence of Limonite? There seems to be a sudden drop in recovery and conc. grade! Any thought of the mechanism of Limonite interaction in the flotation cells?

Obersturmbann
1 year ago
Obersturmbann 1 year ago

Limonite is not a definite mineral, more a rock type. It is largely formed from goethite but also contains clays and other impurities. Drop in recovery and grade may be attributable to clay adsorption of collector and entrainment of clays in the froth product. Recommend you get some mineralogical examinations done on the concentrate to see what is bringing the grade down and also see what happens if you decant off the fines ahead of a flotation test.

Zander Barcalow
1 year ago
Zander Barcalow 1 year ago

You are correct in suggesting limonite is a mixed bag of phases. Being a group term for secondary Fe-oxyhydroxides it can be composed of several different minerals. Usually formed from the oxidation of iron-bearing minerals such as hematite, magnetite etc. It often can have several mineral components but is usually very friable and would slime very easily. As suggested the best idea is to get some mineralogical work completed on your feed and products to evaluate the situation. I would be pleased to help you if you have no other mineralogical support.

Sandeep Bisht
1 year ago
Sandeep Bisht 1 year ago

Normally when you are in Supergene zone of copper mine, you will have oxidized Iron which is turned to hydrated iron oxide minerals in presence of water.

So you can not eliminate those minerals in mining, just you can disperse in flotation by adding some especial dispersants. Also pH adjustment can depress the iron minerals.

We practiced same problems in our plant and increased our grade by addition of those dispersants with optimum dosage.

Sachin Prakash
1 year ago
Sachin Prakash 1 year ago

Thank you all for your great replies. Sorry for my delayed reply; I was off the grid for a few days. We are looking into some mineralogical work and will pursue this until we find a clear answer.

In the mean time we have tried suppressing Iron complexes with pH adjustment (9.5-10.5) by adding hydrated lime (in the lab) and it seems to help the recovery, but not to the point of calling it a successful test. We have also tried a clay/slimes depressant reagent by Pionera (F-100) and that didn't seem to help much.

Any suggestions for testing under different conditions, pH, reagents, etc.?

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