• To participate in the 911Metallurgist Forums, be sure to JOINLOGIN
  • Use Add New Topic to ask a New Question/Discussion about Flotation.
  • OR Select a Topic that Interests you.
  • Use Add Reply = to Reply/Participate in a Topic/Discussion (most frequent).
    Using Add Reply allows you to Attach Images or PDF files and provide a more complete input.
  • Use Add Comment = to comment on someone else’s Reply in an already active Topic/Discussion.

Removal of Arsenic from Tin concentrates (3 replies)

1 month ago
Patrickymt 1 month ago

I have recently been reading about using froth floatation instead of roasters to rid tin concentrates of Arsenic. Has anyone have experience or theories on the best way to go about it. What kind of collector would be best recommended. Anyone used the Jameson cell?



1 month ago
MillMan 1 month ago

Hello Patrick, what form is the Arsenic in? Is it associated/locked with your Tin? Where are you in terms of testing or is this just a hypothetical situation?

Also see https://www.911metallurgist.com/blog/cassiterite-flotation-tin-oxide

1 month ago
Colette 1 month ago
1 like by David

Hi Patrick

If you have a look online for flowsheets for Renison Mine in Tasmania, they recover cassiterite from a sulphide host by doing a sulphide float and rejecting the sulphide concentrate - this includes arsenopyrite. I am assuming you have a similar mineralisation, rather than dealing with a stannite ore? There are actually a few places that do this I think, I am just most familiar with Renison.

The attached image was a screenshot from the Google Books version of Handbook of Flotation Reagents: Chemistry, Theory and Practice: Volume 2 By Srdjan M. Bulatovic. If you can hunt this down, it has an excellent section on cassiterite flotation describing collectors at various operations.

Assuming you have a deposit/mine in mind, the best thing to do is to contact Glencore Technology directly to ask if they have done any work on your type of ore using Jamo's. If you do have a specific ore in mind, then you are going to have to do testwork, and probably a pretty extensive series, if you are thinking of going this route. First step, as MillMan has suggested, would be to get a really good idea of your mineralisation and liberation requirements.


4 weeks ago
David 4 weeks ago

Hi Patrick,

There is a guy who is a specialist in Tin. John Glenn – Burnie Labs (ALS metallurgy Tasmania).

Please join and login to participate and leave a comment.