Geology & GeoMetallurgy

Geology & GeoMetallurgy2017-04-04T06:58:01-04:00
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BLM Prospecting Permit in Eastern Region National Forest?? (4 replies and 2 comments)

ebnk15
1 month ago
ebnk15 1 month ago

Hi,

Can someone provide me with any ideas, or help, on laying out a plan of operation for a BLM Prospecting Permit on National Forest Land in the Eastern Region? I am looking for gold, and have some ideas where I would like to search. Unfortunately, that's about all I have. I have 2 fundamental issues: (1) A lack of granular (geographic area, NOT mineralization size) GIS and 3D modeling data to establish viable targets, and (2) A lack of water along with argillaceous saprolite for placer locations; sporadic quartz stringers for native locations.

Further complicating matters is that I live about 8 hours drive from where I want to prospect. And, the areas I would like to prospect are near small mines that went out of operation prior to the present records, as found on the mrdata.usgs.gov's mrds database.

Regarding my first issue, is the lack of accurate geologic detail below the multiple square mile level of detail found on the publicly available databases. I understand that my required level of detail will require "feet on the ground" using IP or ERT, seismic data and other tools to develop a 3D model of my target areas. Unfortunately, I have neither the access to these tools, nor the time to figure out how to use them. And, paid Consultants are too busy with large clients to be bothered with small fry like me. So, I welcome any advice on how to get around these obstacles.

Regarding my second issue, is having to deal with the argillaceous saprolite and the lack of water at placer locations. Also, the lack of reliable drill hole sampling due to randomly distributed quartz stringers native to the saprolite. Would anyone have any ideas on how I could overcome prospecting challenges on the ground? Since I would be prospecting in a National Forest in the Eastern Region, I am going to assume that anything I could do to mitigate sound and water pollution would be ideal. Therefore, a large electrically assisted pull wagon (with giant tires and ample ground clearance) is paramount. But, besides the wagon would be a lot of battery power (which would be recharged offsite, in the evening). However, what the wagon allows me, is the freedom to take more equipment, including: a portable rock crusher, a one-man electric auger, a small highbanker with a water recirculation system and at least 10 gallons of water (would that even be enough water??). A drywasher probably would NOT work, as the soil is generally moist, even during drought conditions, just below the surface. And, finally, a gold detector and a small set of hand tools. Does anyone see a problem with this list for my application and location preference? 

As an aside, the reason I am even choosing National Forest Land in the Eastern Region is primarily because of the known gold in the area. Also, it would only require dealing with the BLM and the National Forest Service; no private property issues. Would i be required to submit a Plan of Operation for a full size operation, in addition to an Exploration Plan of Operation? And, lastly, if this idea seems like it could use a major revision in its thought process, then I welcome those comments, as well.

 

Thanks.

SmartDog
1 month ago
SmartDog 1 month ago
1 like by ebnk15

Almost all of your questions can be best answered by contacting the BLM office that is in charge of that particular area.  While the general rules are the same, you are looking for specific answers that only they can supply.

They generally don't bite, and can be real helpful in commercial development of federal lands (that's their job).

ebnk15
1 month ago
ebnk15 1 month ago

Thank you very much for this info! I will definitely give them a call!!

When you say, helpful in commercial development, do you mean with regard to potentially providing a network of contacts for rental equipment for IP, ERT and/or a Seismic Data Acquisition device?

Also, if I am able to rent the equipment and have data to process, is it generally easy to work with Universities, for the purpose of developing a 2D or 3D underground Model? Followed by the establishment of economic models, based upon the GIS and 3D Modeling output?

Along the same thought process, do Universities provide paid services to the public (without having to enroll in their school)? Perhaps, as a project for Doctoral degree candidates??

Thanks again for helping me to think "outside of the box" on this stuff!!

 

SmartDog
1 month ago
SmartDog 1 month ago
1 like by ebnk15

When I say helpful it means working with you to get all the permitting (that they are responsible for) done correctly.  But that is only a fraction of the required permitting, which includes everybody from the local road department, fire marshal, and even the US Corps of Engineers (404 Permit).

Yes many Universities will help you both directly and indirectly, BUT not for free they will expect some compensation.  Also they may not provide the best information.

If you are looking for free advice remember you get what you pay for (the information can be worth exactly what it cost you).

The days of starting a mining operation by walking into the woods with a shove are long gone.

 

ebnk15
1 month ago

I have no problem paying a University. I am willing to pay anyone for help. Also, the University I am looking at, has been responsible for that state's Geological Surveys from way back when 🙂

SmartDog
1 month ago
SmartDog 1 month ago

BTW you talk about Eastern Region National Forest and the Bureau of Land  Management, but the BLM lands are 90+% west of Denver.  The lands in the east, especially national forest lands are managed by the US Forest Service, a different agency.  Be sure which one you are talking about and dealing with.

ebnk15
1 month ago

Yes, the land I am looking to prospect is acquired land, with a patchwork of private ownership. But, the Forest Ranger informed me that a BLM Prospecting Permit would be required. As a result, I am trying to "thread the needle" to only prospect on the National Forest Land, and not the patchworked private lands scattered throughout the National Forest. I am hoping the BLM will have more accurate information than I have found on the internet.

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