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How do mill weight affect mill liner wear life (1 reply)

Alan Carter
12 months ago
Alan Carter 12 months ago

I would like to know the relationship between mill weight and mill liner wear, is there an existing model for this? Has anyone looked at this before?

Obviously low mill weight can impact toe position, reduce attrition and abrasion breakage, increase recirculating load, etc, which all contribute to mill liner wear.

If all other parameters were constant (mineralogy, mill density, media g/t, etc) can you develop a relationship that directly relates mill weight to the rate of wear of a liner? What does this relationship look like? Is it linear? Exponential?

Has anyone done this before? Unfortunately as with most mills my feed is quite variable so even at constant mill weight and parameters my wear rates change. I am trying to get an understanding of this relationship, any help would be appreciated.

Bill Fraser
12 months ago
Bill Fraser 12 months ago

Scanalyse (now Outotec) are investigating these type of relationships by integrating precise liner wear and volume measurements with mill operating parameters, including mill weight. One the Analytical-Metallurgists would be more than happy to discuss his current research. I would encourage you to visit http://www.scanalyse.com to get a quick introduction to our technology and services.

From what I know of work done at universities in the area of liner wear (e.g. Radziszewski from https://www.mcgill.ca/mining/home-page it seems that the relationship is with power i.e. kg/kW. Power, in turn, is linked to mill load but that relationship depends on the lifter profile, etc. I think that you may have a better relationship with power than with mill load.

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