Laboratory Testing & General Mineral Processing Engineering

Laboratory Testing & General Mineral Processing Engineering 2017-03-23T09:50:31+00:00
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Small Flow in Large Pipe (7 replies)

Paul Morrow
1 year ago
Paul Morrow 1 year ago

I have a 23.5" I.D. Pipe that is 60' vertical and open to a tank at the bottom. How would you keep 600 gpm of water flowing upwards in the pipe? How do you keep such a small flow from falling out the bottom? We plan on using an 8" discharge.

Tony Verdeschi
1 year ago
Tony Verdeschi 1 year ago

Install a valve at the bottom.

David Kano
1 year ago
David Kano 1 year ago

If you want a meaningful answer to your question it would be helpful if you filled in the gaps.

Bob Mathias
1 year ago
Bob Mathias 1 year ago

Such a small percentage of the population could see the humor in this. I get it. It is hilarious.

Bill Fraser
1 year ago
Bill Fraser 1 year ago

2 pipes; side by side; same I.D. of 23.5": We want water to go up the left pipe and come down the right pipe where it will be pumped up again. The Catch: The left pipe is connected above an open tank where 22" O.D. diameter buoyant spheres will float up inside of the water being pumped. If we install valves at the bottom then we have to open and close them continually to allow the floating spheres to enter into the up pipe. The spheres are 20% buoyant.

Dizzy Flores
1 year ago
Dizzy Flores 1 year ago

The situation is still not really clear, but perhaps you could make use of a mammoth pump, also called air lift pump. This is an excellent solution to overcome low static heads with a big free ball passage.

Carmen Ibanz
1 year ago
Carmen Ibanz 1 year ago

Is that a larger version of an aquarium pump that uses air bubbles to lift the water upwards? It sounds interesting! Is "Mammoth" a brand or is it a type of pump? I am going to look it up on Google.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airlift_pump leads me to believe that the 22" diameter spheres with a density of 800/kg m3 - 20% buoyant in fresh water - will act like bubbles in an airlift pump. Would this cause cavitation of a traditional pump if the discharge were inside the up pipe with water being propelled upwards by buoyancy?

Ace Levy
1 year ago
Ace Levy 1 year ago

The situation is still not really clear.

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